Grateful Stratford Dad Calls for Public to Join Him on Epic Grand Union Trek

A grateful Stratford dad, whose son was cared for at Acorns Children’s Hospice, is calling on members of the public to join him on an epic fundraising trek along the Grand Union Canal.

 

Duncan Fewins from Loxley, is embarking on a week-long, 137-mile trek along the famous Canal from London to Birmingham and aims to raise £7,000 for Acorns – enough to fund one day of care at the charity.

In 1993 Duncan’s son Sam sadly died, just two weeks before his second birthday. Acorns Children’s Hospice, based in Selly Oak, Birmingham, provided vital care for the family and specialist bereavement support.

Duncan said: “In the midst of this tragedy, Acorns provided Sam, myself and his immediate family with invaluable respite care. A chance to clear your head and take some time away.

“They also provided me with incredibly specialist care during and after Sam’s death. In particular, the professional and objective counselling I received kept me sane in a moment of deep personal crisis.”

Duncan will set off on the aptly titled Seven-Grand Union Walk from London’s Little Venice on Monday 13 August and hopes to reach Birmingham’s Gas Street Basin just a week later.

Duncan added: “It costs Acorns £7,000 a day to run one of their three hospices, so I am aiming to raise at least that! I’m hoping friends, family and Acorns supporters will join me en-route and that they too will get sponsorship. The more the merrier!

“Acorns cannot continue supporting life restricted children like my son Sam, unless it receives donations from generous and caring people like you. Whatever you can afford will be gratefully received.”

Carol Pratt, Community Fundraising Development Manager at Acorns, said: “We’re so grateful to Duncan for his support – the money raised will go directly towards our vital work and benefit children and families across the region. We’ll be rooting for Duncan as he sets off on the trek and hope lots of people support him – either by walking with him or donating, or both!”

Acorns provides a network of specialist care and support to babies, children and young people and support for their families, both within its three hospices and in family homes.

It costs the charity nearly £10 million every year to provide its services and it relies on fundraising for the bulk of this amount.

To donate to Duncan’s Just Giving page, please visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Duncan-Fewins

If you’d like to join Duncan on his walk, please email duncan.fewins@hotmail.com

 

ENDS

 

Photo caption: Duncan Fewins. Duncan’s son Sam.

For more information or for interview, photograph or filming opportunities, contact the PR and Communications team:

David Chamberlain: 01564 825020 / 07817 612422 / david.chamberlain@acorns.org.uk

Nicki Robinson: 01564 825062 / 07814 302153 / nicki.robinson@acorns.org.uk

 

 

Notes to editors:

  • Due to the sensitive nature of Acorns care services it refrains from using the words ‘terminal’ or ‘terminally ill’ in its press releases and public communications when describing the children who use Acorns and the conditions that they have. Instead, Acorns uses the words ‘life limited’, ‘life limiting’, or ‘life threatening’. Acorns kindly requests that you respect this in your communications when referring to Acorns Children’s Hospice. Acorns children have a lot of living to do. Thank you.

 

  • This year Acorns is celebrating its 30th Acorns in Birmingham, Selly Oak was opened in 1988 by HRH Diana, Princess of Wales. Acorns in the Black Country, Walsall opened in 1999 and Acorns for the Three Counties, Worcester opened in 2005. To find out more about this year’s 30th celebrations and how you can get involved, visit www.acorns.org.uk/30years

 

  • Acorns is currently the UK and the world’s largest children’s hospice charity, as measured by the number of children who we are helping to care for.

 

  • It costs nearly £10 million a year to run our care services providing care for the child and support for families. Acorns relies heavily on the community to fund the majority of its activities.